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Posts Tagged ‘Smart Growth America’

Guest on The Infra Blog: Geoffrey Anderson, President and CEO, Smart Growth America

Wednesday, July 29th, 2015
Geoffrey Anderson - Photo by Aimee Custis,

Geoffrey Anderson is the President and CEO of Smart Growth America. Named by Partners for Livable Communities as “One of the 100 Most Influential Leaders in Sustainable Community Planning and Development,” Geoff came to his current position after eight years heading the Smart Growth Program at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

“It is amazing to see what local governments and states have done, and how much they have responded. Some of that is amazing in terms of their pro-activeness, and then some is less amazing because it’s become so desperate that they really had to do something, and unlike Congress, they didn’t have the luxury of kicking the issue off another two years without thinking about the longer term.”

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The WalkUP Wake-Up Call: Michigan Metros

Thursday, June 25th, 2015
Metropolitan Land Use Options in the United States

Walkable urban places are not just a phenomenon of coastal U.S. metropolitan areas. This report demonstrates that the market desires them in Michigan—and they are gaining traction. If this emerging trend in favor of walkable urbanism plays out in Michigan as it has in the other metro areas studied by George Washington University—Atlanta, Boston, and Washington, D.C.— it will mean an historic shift away from the drivable development patterns that have dominated development for the latter half of the 20th century. The state could return to the walkable urban development pattern that predominated before World War II.

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Core Values: Why American Companies Are Moving Downtown

Monday, June 22nd, 2015

Hundreds of companies across the United States are moving to and investing in walkable downtown locations. As job migration shifts towards cities and as commercial real estate values climb in these places, a vanguard of American companies are building and expanding in walkable downtown neighborhoods.

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Evaluating Complete Streets Projects: A Guide for Practitioners

Monday, April 27th, 2015
TABLE 1: Recommended access measures and metrics

Across the country, government agencies are working to meet residents’ demands to be more responsive, transparent, and accountable in decisions and investments. Transportation agencies are not exempt from this call—and they face the additional challenges of dwindling capital and maintenance budgets. Performance measures, in the broad sense, provide a quantitative and, sometimes, qualitative indicator of potential or actual performance of a specific street, a corridor, or of the whole transportation network.

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Safer Streets, Stronger Economies

Tuesday, March 24th, 2015
Change in automobile trips after Complete Streets improvements.

In this study of 37 projects, Smart Growth America found that Complete Streets projects tended to improve safety for everyone, increased biking and walking, and showed a mix of increases and decreases in automobile traffic, depending in part on the project goal. Compared to conventional transportation projects, these projects were remarkably affordable, and were an inexpensive way to achieve transportation goals. In terms of economic returns, the limited data available suggests Complete Streets projects were related to broader economic gains like increased employment and higher property values.

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Best Complete Streets Policies of 2014

Thursday, February 12th, 2015
Complete Streets Policies Network

In 2014, more then 70 jurisdictions adopted Complete Streets policies. These laws, resolutions, agency policies, and planning and design documents establish a process for selecting, funding, planning, designing, and building transportation projects that allow safe access to destinations for everyone, regardless of age, ability, income, or ethnicity, and no matter how they travel.

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The Innovative DOT: Pricing Strategies

Friday, January 30th, 2015
The Innovative DOT: Focus Area 3

Appropriate pricing strategies can raise revenues and manage demand, keeping costs down. On the other hand, when transportation system users do not see appropriate price signals, demand is artificially high, increasing congestion and pressure for new capacity. State departments of transportation generally cannot impose price signals on their own, but they can work with a variety of stakeholders and decision-makers, from legislators to insurance companies, to accomplish these goals.

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The Innovative DOT: Revenue Allocation and Project Selection

Tuesday, January 20th, 2015
Innovative DOT: Area 2 - Revenue Allocation and Project Selection

Scarce transportation dollars need to be spent where they do the most good. But making changes to long-standing practices, some of which are ensconced in law, can be difficult and present a hurdle to state departments of transportation (DOTs) looking to get the best bang for their buck. Pressing forward with revenue allocation and project selection reform represents a major way in which DOTs can deliver projects with greater impact more quickly. Many agencies are now reforming project selection and formula funding processes for sub-state units of government, often tying proposed spending to state, departmental, and/or local goals and objectives.

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Foot Traffic Ahead: Ranking Walkable Urbanism in America’s Largest Metros

Friday, June 20th, 2014
U.S. Metropolitan Land Use Options


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Dangerous By Design 2014

Tuesday, May 20th, 2014
FIGURE 1 U.S. pedestrian fatalities, 2003–2012

American communities are poised for a renaissance in walking. We’re walking more often, for fun and to get to places in our neighborhood. We turn to when figuring out where to live and our most walkable places often are among the most economically vibrant in the country. Hundreds of cities have adopted Complete Streets policies to ensure walking is at the forefront of our decisions regarding street design. Public health organizations from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and the Office of the Surgeon General to the local doctor’s office are encouraging us to get out for a walk for physical activity and to combat chronic disease. And indeed, we are walking: six out of 10 people walk for physical activity, and the share of adults who said they walk for transportation grew 6 percent from 2005 to 2010, according to the most recent data available. But we are still dealing with a legacy of roadways that fail to account for the safety of people on foot.

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