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Posts Tagged ‘Global Warming’

Responsible for what? Carbon producer CO2 contributions and the energy transition

Wednesday, September 13th, 2017
CO2 contributions - Sherco Generating Station - Photo by Tony Webster from Minneapolis, Minnesota

The article this accompanies is the third in an important series. The foundational analysis of the contributions of major carbon producers to atmospheric CO2 emissions and methane emissions was the first to appear (Heede 2014), followed by a rich and concrete analysis of the moral responsibilities of the major carbon producers in light of those contributions (Frumhoff et al. 2015). This third analysis not only refines the calculations of the contributions of major carbon producers to atmospheric CO2 and methane emissions but also expands the calculations to include the contributions of those same producers to global mean surface temperature and global sea level (Ekwurzel et al. 2017).

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Climate Change Damages to Alaska Public Infrastructure

Friday, February 24th, 2017
Fig. 1. Alaska’s boroughs overlaid on a map of permafrost distribution across the state.

Climate change in Alaska is causing widespread environmental change that is damaging critical infrastructure. As climate change continues, infrastructure may become more vulnerable to damage, increasing risks to residents and resulting in large economic impacts.

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Economic growth in a low carbon world: How to reconcile growth and climate through energy productivity

Tuesday, January 31st, 2017
Structural Break in Energy Demand

ENERGY TRANSITIONS COMMISSION An analysis of energy demand trends and drivers in low carbon scenarios prepared by Vivid Economics for the Energy Transitions Commission In the absence of a demand-side energy transition, global energy demand is likely to grow by 60% to 2050 and greater efforts will be required to decarbonise energy supply. We analysed […]

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Natural Gas and Global Warming: A Review of Evidence Finds that Methane Leaks Undercut the Climate Benefits of Natural Gas

Friday, August 5th, 2016
Figure 1. Avoiding Climate Tipping Points Requires Immediate Reductions in Methane Emissions

In recent years, a number of studies have challenged that assumption, finding that natural gas production, transportation and storage results in major leaks of methane to the atmosphere that erode or nullify the climate benefits of shifting to natural gas. These findings should lead policymakers to reject natural gas as a “bridge fuel” and instead lead them to redouble America’s efforts to repower with truly clean energy from the sun, the wind and other renewable sources of energy.

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A New Way Forward: Envisioning a Transportation System without Carbon Pollution

Thursday, May 26th, 2016
Figure 1: Transportation Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Country

FRONTIER GROUP
By employing smart strategies to repower our vehicles with electricity, reduce growth in vehicle travel, and optimize the efficiency of our transportation network, America’s urban areas can reduce energy demand for light-duty vehicles by as much as 90 percent below anticipated levels by 2050.

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More Wind, Less Warming

Wednesday, December 17th, 2014
Figure ES-1. A Path to 30 Percent Wind Electricity

ENVIRONMENT TEXAS
American wind power is already significantly reducing global warming pollution. In 2013 alone, wind power averted 132 million metric tons of carbon dioxide emissions – as much as would be produced by 34 typical coal-fired power plants. But with the United States and the world needing to move toward a future of 100 percent clean energy in order to prevent the worst impacts of global warming, America must do much more.

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Climate Change in the United States: The Prohibitive Costs of Inaction

Thursday, November 12th, 2009

UNION OF CONCERNED SCIENTISTS
“Recognizing the urgency of global warming, policy makers are beginning to pursue solutions to help us avoid the worst effects of climate change, while transitioning the nation to a clean energy economy. However, the debate over comprehensive climate and energy policy often focuses on the costs of climate action, rather than on the serious economic and environmental consequences if we fail to act. One study shows that if global warming emissions continue to grow unabated—a high-emissions scenario—the annual economic impact of more severe hurricanes, residential real-estate losses to sea-level rise, and growing water and energy costs could reach 1.4 percent of GDP by 2025, and 1.9 percent by 2100 (Ackerman and Stanton 2008).”

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