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Archive for the ‘Climate Change’ Category

Ensuring New Infrastructure is Climate-Smart

Thursday, October 8th, 2015
Global investment requirements 2015–2030, US$ trillion, constant 2010 dollars


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ASCE: Engineering Resilient Cities

Tuesday, October 6th, 2015
ASCE: Engineering Resilient Cities

In “Engineering a Resilient Community,” watch experts discuss what it means to be resilient, why it’s important and how sustainability and resiliency are interconnected.

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Accelerating U.S. Clean Energy Deployment

Wednesday, September 30th, 2015
Table 1: Ways for Institutional Investors to Finance Clean Energy

Institutional investors, and the corporations they invest in, are playing a growing role in financing the clean energy infrastructure needed to meet international climate goals. These investors and companies must support policymakers who seek an international agreement that will provide clearer market signals and greater certainty for needed clean energy investments.

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Accelerating Low-Carbon Development in the World’s Cities

Tuesday, September 15th, 2015
Figure 1 The net present value (NPV) of the urban mitigation scenario in the transport, buildings and waste sectors between 2015 and 2050

Cities are engines of economic growth and social change. About 85% of global GDP in 2015 was generated in cities. By 2050, two-thirds of the global population will live in urban areas. Compact, connected and efficient cities can generate stronger growth and job creation, alleviate poverty and reduce investment costs, as well as improve quality of life through lower air pollution and traffic congestion. Better, more resilient models of urban development are particularly critical for rapidly urbanizing cities in the developing world.

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Natural Gas & Pipeline Infrastructure: Impacts of the Clean Power Plan

Friday, September 4th, 2015
Figure 1. Projected U.S. Natural Gas Demand in AEE Institute Scenarios

The Environmental Protection Agency’s proposed Clean Power Plan (CPP) establishes state-by-state carbon emissions rate targets that it projects will reduce U.S. electricity sector carbon emissions 30% below 2005 levels by 2030. Some stakeholders, including the North American Electric Reliability Corp. (NERC), have raised concerns that states might rely heavily on natural gas generation for CPP compliance, creating stress on gas pipeline capacity and ultimately affecting electric system reliability. While it is likely that states will pursue a diverse portfolio of emission reductions, examining the infrastructure implications of gas use scenarios helps with risk management.

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Cool Solutions: New Technology to Fight Climate Change in Massachusetts

Tuesday, September 1st, 2015
Figure ES-1. Historical Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Trajectories Needed to Achieve 2020, 2030 and 2050 Emission Reduction Targets

To ensure that the Commonwealth stays on track to meet its target under the Global Warming Solutions Act of cutting emissions by at least 80 percent by 2050, Massachusetts should adopt a target of reducing greenhouse gas emissions to at least 45 percent below 1990 levels by 2030…Achieving that goal will require Massachusetts to fully implement previous commitments to reduce global warming pollution. It will also require us to take full advantage of a new wave of game-changing opportunities – from cutting-edge technologies to emerging societal trends – that can help Massachusetts build on its position of national leadership in the fight against global warming.

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Interactive Map: California Climate Investments

Wednesday, August 26th, 2015
California Climate Investment Map - broad

A new interactive map from the State of California shows just how serious the Golden State is about the climate. Literally hundreds of pins dot the map, from San Diego to Humboldt, and each one represents a unique effort to mitigate climate change and promote sustainable living.

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Chesapeake Bay: Sea Level Rise Over the Next Century

Monday, August 10th, 2015
Figure 1. Map showing Atlantic coast of the United States with population density by county (U.S. Census Bureau, 2010) placed alongside Late Holocene and twentieth-century relative sea-level rise (RSL)

Today, relative sea-level rise (3.4 mm/yr) is faster in the Chesapeake Bay region than any other location on the Atlantic coast of North America, and twice the global average eustatic rate (1.7 mm/yr). Dated interglacial deposits suggest that relative sea levels in the Chesapeake Bay region deviate from global trends over a range of timescales…The sea level for any location at a given point in time represents a sum of factors, including the volume of ocean water, steric (thermal) effects, tectonic activity, and crustal deformation in response to glacio-hydro-isostatic adjustment (GIA) from loading and unloading of continental ice and water masses (Church et al., 2010).

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Low-Carbon Electricity Pathways for the U.S. and the South

Monday, August 3rd, 2015
Figure 1. The Proposed Emissions Rate Reduction Targets

Power plants are one of the largest sources of carbon pollution in the U.S., accounting for nearly 39% of annual CO2 emissions from the combustion of fossil fuels (EIA, 2014, Table A.18). On June 2, 2014, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) proposed state-specific limits on CO2 emissions from existing fossil fuel-fired electric generating units (EGUs) as part of its Clean Power Plan (CPP).

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Come Heat and High Water: Climate Risk in the Southeastern U.S. and Texas

Friday, July 31st, 2015

The Southeast U.S. and Texas are experiencing an economic boom, mostly due to manufacturing and energy industry growth. But that boom is at risk from unchecked climate change, which could render this region—already one of the hottest and most weather-vulnerable of the country—at significant economic risk. However, if policymakers and business leaders act aggressively to adapt to the changing climate and to mitigate future impacts by reducing their carbon emissions, this region can lead in responding to climate risk. The Southeast can demonstrate to national and global political leaders the kind of strong response necessary to ensure a strong economic future.

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