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Archive for the ‘Sustainability’ Category

Untapped Potential: Opportunities for affordable homes and neighborhoods near transit

Thursday, November 23rd, 2017
Transit-Oriented Development in NYC Metro - Homes in Parking Lots

Without new affordable homes and walkable neighborhoods, housing markets tighten and costs rise, leading to less disposable income, longer commutes, the need to work longer hours, more stress, and poorer health for the region’s households. This disparity falls most heavily on the region’s lower-income households who, as referenced in RPA’s report Pushed Out, have seen housing costs rise unabated and continue to get pushed further away from central, walkable areas with access to jobs2. But it affects others as well – young families, seniors and anyone who needs affordable housing and doesn’t want to or can’t spend hours a day behind the wheel.

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Funding flowing to Texas resulting soon in hundreds of immediate contracting opportunities

Thursday, November 9th, 2017

When the Hurricane Harvey federal disaster relief funding spigot finally opens in Washington, D.C., Texas cities and counties with recovery projects – some of which will be mega-million dollar projects – are hopeful their projects will be among those funded. And when the funding starts flowing, contracting opportunities will be abundant. Private-sector firms throughout the country willing to bring their experience and resources to the Texas Gulf Coast will be called on to contract with public-sector entities to help with the rebuilding of Texas.

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Engineering: Why the Netherlands Isn’t Under Water

Wednesday, November 8th, 2017

Following World War II, when the Netherlands was still reeling from five years of German occupation, a massive storm hit the small coastal nation. The flooding that ensued caused thousands of fatalities and incalculable property losses. But Dutch engineers weren’t going to let nature have her way that easily. Their storm-surge barriers, a modern marvel of engineering, serve as an excellent example for coastal areas around the world.

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The Road to Electric Vehicles

Wednesday, November 1st, 2017

Southern California Edison plays a crucial role in the move to zero-emission electric transportation—and to a world where the energy that propels us forward comes from the earth’s renewable resources.

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Coastal Adaptation: A Framework for Governance and Funding to Address Climate Change

Monday, October 30th, 2017
NYC - coastal adaptation

REGIONAL PLAN ASSOCIATION (RPA) Executive Summary Over the next 30 years, the number of people living in places at risk of flooding from an extreme storm in the New York-New Jersey-Connecticut region is likely to double from 1 million to 2 million. Sea levels are projected to rise by two feet, putting 10,000 homes permanently […]

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U.S. Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions

Thursday, October 26th, 2017
Figure 1. Energy-related CO2 emissions, 1990–2016

Energy‐related carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions decreased by 89 million metric tons(MMmt), from 5,259 MMmt in 2015 to 5,170 MMmt in 2016. Although real gross domestic product (GDP) increased 1.5% over that period, other factors contributing to energy-related CO2 emissions more than offset the growth in GDP, leading to a 1.7% decline in energy-related CO2.

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Guest on The Infra Blog: Namrita Kapur, Environmental Defense Fund (EDF)

Wednesday, October 25th, 2017
Namrita Kapur on The Infra blog

Our systems and services in infrastructure are pretty compromised right now, especially in areas that have been subject to extreme weather events. But even if they haven’t, we’ve got a lot of infrastructure that, frankly, is falling apart. We haven’t done a good job of maintaining it, and we don’t have enough resources to maintain or resuscitate that infrastructure. So the reason this is important is because it creates a path for being able to address that issue. To create the type of infrastructure that we need to provide energy security, safe drinking water, reliable transportation, all the services and needs we have from our day to day infrastructure that we aren’t receiving right now through our public sector.

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National Plug-In Electric Vehicle Infrastructure Analysis

Monday, October 16th, 2017
Electric Vehicle Infrastructure ES-1

This report addresses the fundamental question of how much plug-in electric vehicle (PEV) charging infrastructure—also known as electric vehicle supply equipment (EVSE)—is needed in the United States to support both plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) and battery electric vehicles (BEVs). It complements ongoing EVSE initiatives by providing a comprehensive analysis of national PEV charging infrastructure requirements. The result is a quantitative estimate for a U.S. network of non-residential (public and workplace) EVSE that would be needed to support broader PEV adoption. The analysis provides guidance to public and private stakeholders who are seeking to provide nationwide charging coverage, improve the EVSE business case by maximizing station utilization, and promote effective use of private/public infrastructure investments.

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Natural Disasters or Natural Hazards? Why We Need to Rebuild Smarter

Wednesday, October 11th, 2017

“They are natural hazards. They only become disasters where and how we have built our environments.” “And the current plan will be build it back the way it was. Rebuild it back to the past. Rebuild it back to fail again.” -Craig Fugate, Former FEMA Administrator Video by seeprogress on YouTube

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Funding Trees for Health: An Analysis of Finance and Policy Actions to Enable Tree Planting for Public Health

Monday, October 9th, 2017
Figure E1. Trees and Public health. Conceptual model of the linkage between urban forestry funding and health funding.

The scientific case for the benefits of trees and urban nature has become more solid over the last few decades. Trees and other natural features in cities can help regulate water quality, water quantity, and the timing of water flow. They can help clean and cool the air, reducing harmful air pollutants and ambient air temperatures. They lend beauty to our streets, enhance citizens’ lives, and significantly increase property values. When you consider all the benefits that street trees can provide to society, there is a strong business case for increased societal investment. One study in California, for instance, found that for every $1 spent on tree planting and maintenance, urban trees deliver $5.82 in benefits.

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